LIVE STREAM – S FRANCIS DE SALES

St Francis de Sales (1567 – 1622)
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MASS – 0930  –  http://ustre.am/UCOl
He was born near Annécy, in Savoy, studied the law, and was ordained to the priesthood despite the opposition of his father. His first mission was to re-evangelize the people of his home district (the Chablais), who had gone over to Calvinism. Always in danger of his life from hostile Calvinists, he preached with such effectiveness that after four years most of the people had returned to the Church. He was then appointed bishop of Geneva, and spent the rest of his life reforming and reorganising the diocese, and in caring for the souls of his people by preaching and spiritual guidance.
  St Francis taught that we can all attain a devout and spiritual life, whatever our position in society: holiness is not reserved for monks and hermits alone. He wrote that “religious devotion does not destroy: it perfects,” and his spiritual counsel is dedicated to making people more holy by making them more themselves. In his preaching against Calvinism he was driven by love rather than a desire to win: so much so, that it was a Calvinist minister who said “if we honoured anyone as a saint, I know of no-one since the days of the Apostles more worthy of it than this man.”
  St Francis is the patron saint of writers and journalists, who would do well to imitate his love and his moderation: as he said, “whoever wants to preach effectively must preach with love.”

LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

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7.30pm  http://ustre.am/UCOl

The essence of our call to conversion continues to be reflected in the words which God spoke to his people of old through Moses: “Be holy, for I, the LORD your God, am holy” (Lev 19:2). And in his encyclical letter on the Eucharist issued in 1965 and entitled, Mystery of Faith, Paul VI said that “The most efficacious way of growing in holiness is time spent with Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.” The fruit of this belief has been attested to by many in recent times through the practice of opening chapels of adoration in parishes so that folk can spend at least an hour a week before the Eucharist presence of Our Lord reposed in a tabernacle or exposed on an altar.

THE JESUS PRAYER

The classical form of the Jesus Prayer is,

          “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

The actual words of our short prayers can vary. We might say the classic version of the Jesus Prayer, or we might say, “Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.” We may say, “Lord Jesus, have mercy.” Or, we might say a Psalm verse, or a Bible quote, or some other prayer.

Monks of old said, “Lord, make haste to help me. Lord, make speed to save me,” all day long.

The history of the Jesus Prayer goes back, as far as we know, to the early sixth century, with Diadochos, who taught that repetition of the prayer leads to inner stillness. Even earlier John Cassian recommended this type of prayer. In the fourth century Egypt, in Nitria, short “arrow” prayers were practiced.

Abba Macarius of Egypt said there is no need to waste time with words. It is enough to hold out your hands and say, “Lord, according to your desire and your wisdom, have mercy.” If pressed in the struggle, say, “Lord, save me!” or say, “Lord.” He knows what is best for us, and will have mercy upon us.

Following the Practice of the Community of the Servants of the Will of God at Crawley Down, during Advent we will say the Jesus Prayer communally each Tuesday.