ST DOMINIC

Mass 0930

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St Dominic in prayer

St Dominic (1170 – 1221)
He was born in Castile (part of modern Spain) and became a canon of the cathedral of Osma. He accompanied his bishop (Diego de Azevedo) in a mission of preaching against the Albigensian heresy, which was then strong in southern France. While the official missions lived in formality and splendour, Dominic and Diego lived in extreme poverty, and prepared with great diligence for the debates that they held with their opponents. When the suppression of Albigensianism was undertaken by invasion and war of a particularly savage kind, Dominic continued to try to preach and persuade.
  In 1216 he founded the Order of Preachers, dedicated to saving souls by preaching and persuasion. Like the Franciscans, founded a few years before, the Dominicans put great importance on poverty, both of the individual and of the community, and of the need to be involved directly in the world while still living some form of monastic life. At a time when the settled Benedictine monasteries had grown into great and rich institutions, this was a revolutionary and to some a subversive concept. The Friars made a lasting impact on the life of mediaeval Europe, and the Dominicans in particular altered the course of intellectual history by making a well-thought-out and rational response to the new learning that was appearing as long-forgotten thinkers such as Aristotle became known once more in the Christian West.
  Dominic died at Bologna on 6th August 1221.
HOLY HOUR  & JESUS PRAYER FOR IRAQ
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1915
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LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

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7.30pm  http://ustre.am/UCOl

THE O ANTIPHONS

Every day at Vespers (Evening Prayer), the Magnificat (Canticle of Mary) is accompanied by an antiphon or refrain which gives a particular focus to the celebration. From the 17 to 23 December a special sequence of antiphons is used known as the O antiphons (all begin with the word “O”) or Greater antiphons. They are of ancient origin although no one is quite sure when they were first used. Boethius (fifth century) mentions them, and by the eighth century the abbey of St Benoît sur Loire had elaborated a solemn ritual which most Benedictines still use today.

pp wisdom

17 December
O Sapientia, quæ ex ore Altissimi prodiisti, attingens a fine usque ad finem, fortiter suaviterque disponens omnia: veni ad docendum nos viam prudentiæ. 

O Wisdom, you come forth from the mouth of the Most High. You fill the universe and hold all things together in a strong yet gentle manner: come to teach us the way of truth.

Isaiah 11:2-3; Isaiah 28:29

LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

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7.30pm  http://ustre.am/UCOl

The essence of our call to conversion continues to be reflected in the words which God spoke to his people of old through Moses: “Be holy, for I, the LORD your God, am holy” (Lev 19:2). And in his encyclical letter on the Eucharist issued in 1965 and entitled, Mystery of Faith, Paul VI said that “The most efficacious way of growing in holiness is time spent with Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.” The fruit of this belief has been attested to by many in recent times through the practice of opening chapels of adoration in parishes so that folk can spend at least an hour a week before the Eucharist presence of Our Lord reposed in a tabernacle or exposed on an altar.

THE JESUS PRAYER

The classical form of the Jesus Prayer is,

          “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

The actual words of our short prayers can vary. We might say the classic version of the Jesus Prayer, or we might say, “Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.” We may say, “Lord Jesus, have mercy.” Or, we might say a Psalm verse, or a Bible quote, or some other prayer.

Monks of old said, “Lord, make haste to help me. Lord, make speed to save me,” all day long.

The history of the Jesus Prayer goes back, as far as we know, to the early sixth century, with Diadochos, who taught that repetition of the prayer leads to inner stillness. Even earlier John Cassian recommended this type of prayer. In the fourth century Egypt, in Nitria, short “arrow” prayers were practiced.

Abba Macarius of Egypt said there is no need to waste time with words. It is enough to hold out your hands and say, “Lord, according to your desire and your wisdom, have mercy.” If pressed in the struggle, say, “Lord, save me!” or say, “Lord.” He knows what is best for us, and will have mercy upon us.

Following the Practice of the Community of the Servants of the Will of God at Crawley Down, during Advent we will say the Jesus Prayer communally each Tuesday.

LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

LIVE STREAM – HOLY HOUR AND JESUS PRAYER

Image

7.30pm  http://ustre.am/UCOl

The essence of our call to conversion continues to be reflected in the words which God spoke to his people of old through Moses: “Be holy, for I, the LORD your God, am holy” (Lev 19:2). And in his encyclical letter on the Eucharist issued in 1965 and entitled, Mystery of Faith, Paul VI said that “The most efficacious way of growing in holiness is time spent with Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.” The fruit of this belief has been attested to by many in recent times through the practice of opening chapels of adoration in parishes so that folk can spend at least an hour a week before the Eucharist presence of Our Lord reposed in a tabernacle or exposed on an altar.

THE JESUS PRAYER

The classical form of the Jesus Prayer is,

Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.

The actual words of our short prayers can vary. We might say the classic version of the Jesus Prayer, or we might say, “Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy on me.” We may say, “Lord Jesus, have mercy.” Or, we might say a Psalm verse, or a Bible quote, or some other prayer.

Monks of old said, “Lord, make haste to help me. Lord, make speed to save me,” all day long.

The history of the Jesus Prayer goes back, as far as we know, to the early sixth century, with Diadochos, who taught that repetition of the prayer leads to inner stillness. Even earlier John Cassian recommended this type of prayer. In the fourth century Egypt, in Nitria, short “arrow” prayers were practiced.

Abba Macarius of Egypt said there is no need to waste time with words. It is enough to hold out your hands and say, “Lord, according to your desire and your wisdom, have mercy.” If pressed in the struggle, say, “Lord, save me!” or say, “Lord.” He knows what is best for us, and will have mercy upon us.

Following the Practice of the Community of the Servants of the Will of God at Crawley Down, during Advent we will say the Jesus Prayer communally each Tuesday.